Welcome to the website of St John Vianney Parish
Kamloops, British Columbia!

We hope that this site provides you with some information on our parish family. Everyone is welcome to visit and participate in our parish life.

Overview of the Month – January 2016

holy nameThe month of January is dedicated to the Holy Name of Jesus, which is celebrated on January 3. The first ten days of January fall during the liturgical season known as Christmas which is represented by the liturgical color white. The remaining days of January are the beginning of Ordinary Time. The liturgical color changes to green — a symbol of the hope of reaping the eternal harvest of heaven, especially the hope of a glorious resurrection.

Crosses and Crucifixes

I will change your olive wood cross from the Holy Land to a crucifix by adding a bronze corpus of the crucified Christ for a donation to the Christian Refugee Relief Fund administered by the Knights of Columbus.

CrossesThe violence in the Middle East has led to many deaths and the greatest refugee crisis since WWII. Over four million people have been displaced. Among the most affected are Iraqi and Syrian Christians, who are the victims of ongoing systematic cleansing and persecution. To date, more than $4 million has been donated to relief efforts in Iraq and Syria through the Knights of Columbus Christian Refugee Relief Fund. As Catholics, we are called to stand in solidarity with all those Christians around the world who are suffering from violent persecution, offering spiritual and material assistance to these victims of crimes against humanity.

If you would like to help in this effort, please email me at brianselzler@telus.net

Highlights of the Month

st-joseph-and-baby-jesusIn the first part of January we continue to rejoice and celebrate Christ's coming at Bethlehem and in our hearts. We have the wonderful feasts of Mary, Mother of God, where we honor Mary's highest title, and then we follow the Magi to the crib as they bring their gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh on Epiphany. Finally we reach the culmination of this season with the Baptism of Our Lord by St. John the Baptist. With a touch of sadness we take down our decorations and enter into the liturgical period known as Ordinary Time where we will devote ourselves to the mystery of Christ in its entirety.

This is a time of growth and an opportunity to allow the dignity of Sunday to shine forth prolonging the joy of Easter and Pentecost. Besides those previously mentioned the month's major feasts include: St. Basil the Great and St. Gregory Nazianzen (January 2), St. Elizabeth Ann Seton (January 4), St. John Neumann (January 5), St. Andre Bessette (January 6), St. Raymond of Penafort (January 7), Sts. Fabian and Sebastian (January 20), St. Agnes (January 21), St. Vincent of Saragossa (January 23), the Conversion of St. Paul (January 25), Sts. Timothy and Titus (January 26), St. Angela Merici (January 27), St. Thomas Aquinas (January 28), and St. John Bosco (January 31).

The feasts of the Holy Name of Jesus (January 3), St. Anthony, abbot (January 17) and St. Francis de Sales (January 24), are superseded by the Sunday liturgy.

The Winter Season

01_winter_churchThe opening days of January may be cold and nature bleak, but the domestic church still glows warm with the peace and joy of Christmas. We dedicate the New Year to Mary on the January 1st Solemnity honoring her as Mother of God; and on January 4, the Solemnity of Epiphany, we rejoice with her, as her Son is adored by the three Wise Men.

Herald John, who ushered in the Advent season, is present once again to close Christmastide on the feast of the Baptism of Our Lord (The First Luminous Mystery), and to open the Season of Ordinary Time. He points to Jesus, the Lamb of God who unites time and eternity in the Eucharistic Sacrifice, and even January’s diminishing darkness seems to echo St. John’s prayer: “He must increase and I must decrease.”

In this liturgical season the Church eagerly follows Our Lord as he gathers his apostles and announces his mission. At Cana’s wedding feast (The Second Luminous Mystery) he performs his first public miracle at the request of his Mother, and his disciples saw his glory and believed in him.

We, his present-day disciples pray for a like faith as we contemplate the eternal wedding feast of the Lamb and the unique role of the Blessed Mother in the plan of salvation. May we wholeheartedly obey her words of counsel: “Do whatever he tells you.”

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What Does Ordinary Time Mean?

Ordinary Time is called "ordinary" because the weeks are numbered. The Latin word ordinalis, which refers to numbers in a series, stems from the Latin word ordo, from which we get the English word order. Thus, Ordinary Time is in fact the ordered life of the Church—the period in which we live our lives neither in feasting (as in the Christmas and Easter seasons) or in more severe penance (as in Advent and Lent), but in watchfulness and expectation of the Second Coming of Christ.

Personal Holiness and the Liturgy

The Mass admits of limitless levels and layers of understanding. A richness of outward signs points to inward realities of grace; sensible symbols become gateways to the mystical realm. The Church wisely uses externals – words, gestures, and material things we can see, hear and smell – to surround the sacred mysteries that will sanctify her children.

With urgency, therefore, the Magisterium encourages us to participate fully and actively in the liturgical sacrifice: by coming to it with proper dispositions; by offering our lives with the sacrifice of Christ our High priest; by growing in our knowledge and appreciation of the Mass; and by leading our children, through instruction and example, to a deeper understanding and love of the faith and the liturgy.

"Saint John Vianney, the patron of parish priests"

Man has a noble task: that of prayer and love. To pray and to love, that is the happiness of man on earth.

Prayer is nothing else than union with God. When the heart is pure and united with God it is consoled and filled with sweetness; it is dazzled by a marvelous light.

In a prayer well made, troubles vanish like snow under the rays of the sun.

St. John Vianney Prayers ›

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The Rosary

There are few prayer forms that are as “kid-friendly” as the rosary. While an entire rosary might be too much for some kids, a decade of the rosary can be the perfect length for a short, yet meaningful family prayer time. Holding a sacred object is important to children, and the rosary provides that.  Each of the 10 Hail Marys within a decade can be an opportunity to have different children lead by saying the first half of the prayer. Before each bead, family members can take turns offering a specific prayer intention.